Sale!

Test bank For Understanding Research A Consumers Guide 2nd Edition by Vicki L. Plano Clark

$55.00

-21%

👉 A complete Solution Manual & Testbank Solutions

Original Source from Publisher

115 in stock

Test bank For Understanding Research A Consumers Guide 2nd Edition by Vicki L. Plano Clark
Test bank For Understanding Research A Consumers Guide 2nd Edition by Vicki L. Plano Clark $70.00 $55.00
This item is selling fast!

✅ Format: Digital copy DOC DOCX PDF RTF in a "ZIP file."

☑️ All the chapters are included.

⌛ Time: 30 min to 5 Hours after Payment

😍 Chat Online Available 24/24

Guaranteed Safe Checkout

Test bank For Understanding Research A Consumers Guide 2nd Edition by Vicki L. Plano Clark

Test bank For Understanding Research A Consumers Guide 2nd Edition by Vicki L. Plano Clark

This is the eBook of the printed book and may not include any media, website access codes, or print supplements that may come packaged with the bound book.   This introductory text is written specifically for consumers of research – anyone who uses the results and implications of research studies to enhance their knowledge and improve their practice. The focus is on guiding students toward a basic understanding of the research process, allowing them to develop the skills, knowledge and strategies needed to read, interpret, and evaluate the quality of research reports. The text provides balanced coverage of quantitative, qualitative, and combined research approaches.

Additional ISBNs

0132902230, 0137416458, 9780132902236, 9780137416455, 013355032X, 9780133550320

Table of Contents
Understanding Research A Consumer’s Guide
About The Authors
Preface
New to the Second Edition
Philosophy and Purpose for this Book
Key Features
Helps Students Learn to Read and Evaluate Research Articles
Balances Coverage of Diverse Approaches to Research
Includes Extensive Examples and Practice Activities to Engage Students with the Content
Supplementary Materials
Online Instructor’s Manual with Test Bank
Online PowerPoint® Slides
TestGen
Brief Contents
Contents
Part I An Introduction to Understanding Research
Chapter 1 The Process of Research: Learning How Research is Conducted and Reported
How Do You Identify Reports of Research?
Recognize That Formal Research Includes the Collection and Analysis of Data
Distinguish Reports of Research From Other Types of Scholarly Writing
Example 1—Identifying an article that is a research study
Example 2—Identifying an article that is NOT a research study
Why Do You Need to Read Research Reports?
Read Research to Add to Your Professional Knowledge
Read Research to Inform Your Position in Policy Debates
Read Research to Improve Your Practice
Where Do You Find Reports of Research?
Check Your Understanding
What Steps Do Researchers Take When Conducting Their Studies?
Step 1—Identifying a Research Problem
Step 2—Reviewing the Literature
Step 3—Specifying a Purpose
Step 4—Choosing a Research Design
Step 5—Selecting Participants and Collecting Data
Step 6—Analyzing the Data and Reporting Results
Step 7—Drawing Conclusions
Step 8—Disseminating and Evaluating the Research
How Do You Identify the Steps of the Research Process Within the Major Sections of a Research Article?
Front Matter
The Introduction Section
The Method Section
The Results Section
The Conclusion Section
Back Matter
How Should You Examine Research Articles That Interest You?
Reviewing What You’ve Learned To Do
Reading Research Articles
Understanding Research Articles
An Example of Quantitative Research: The Physical-Activity-in-Middle-Schools Study
Association between social and environmental factors and physical activity opportunities in middle schools
Keywords
Introduction
Methods
Study design
Participants
Procedure
Instrumentation
Data analysis
Results
PE Teachers’ Perceptions of Physical Activity Opportunities
The relationship between physical activity opportunities and associated factors
Discussion
PE teachers’ perceptions of physical activity opportunities in middle school
(16) Association between factors and physical activity opportunities
Limitations of study
Conclusion and recommendations
References
Biographical details
An Example of Qualitative Research: The Physical-Activity-at-Daycare Study
Physical activity at daycare: Childcare providers’ perspectives for improvements
Keywords
Introduction
Methods
Results
Enhanced staff training/workshops
Guest physical activity instructors
Additional equipment and resources
Increased funds for physical activity
NASPE physical activity guidelines
Discussion
Future directions
Conclusion
References
Chapter 2 Quantitative and Qualitative Research: Understanding Different Types of Study Reports
How Do You Identify Quantitative and Qualitative Research Studies?
Quantitative Research Studies Emphasize Numeric Data and Statistical Analyses to Explain Variables
Qualitative Research Studies Emphasize Text Data and Thematic Analyses to Explore a Phenomenon
Combined Research Studies Include Both Quantitative and Qualitative Research to Understand a Topic
Why Should You Read Both Quantitative and Qualitative Research Studies?
What are the Key Differences in the Steps of the Research Process in Quantitative and Qualitative Studies?
Step 1—Researchers Identify a Research Problem
Identifying a Research Problem in Quantitative Research.
Identifying a Research Problem in Qualitative Research.
Step 2—Researchers Review the Literature
Reviewing the Literature in Quantitative Research.
Reviewing the Literature in Qualitative Research.
Step 3—Researchers Specify a Purpose
Specifying a Purpose in Quantitative Research.
Specifying a Purpose in Qualitative Research.
Step 4—Researchers Choose a Research Design
Choosing a Research Design in Quantitative Research.
Choosing a Research Design in Qualitative Research.
Step 5—Researchers Select Participants and Collect Data
Selecting Participants and Collecting Data in Quantitative Research.
Selecting Participants and Collecting Data in Qualitative Research.
Step 6—Researchers Analyze Data and Report Results
Analyzing Data and Reporting Results in Quantitative Research.
Analyzing Data and Reporting Results in Qualitative Research.
Step 7—Researchers Draw Conclusions
Drawing Conclusions in Quantitative Research.
Drawing Conclusions in Qualitative Research.
Step 8—Researchers Disseminate and Evaluate the Research
Disseminating and Evaluating the Research in Quantitative Research.
Disseminating and Evaluating the Research in Qualitative Research.
How Do You Evaluate Quantitative and Qualitative Studies?
Reviewing What You’ve Learned To Do
Reading Research Articles
Understanding Research Articles
Evaluating Research Articles
Part II Understanding the Introduction Sections of Research Reports
Chapter 3 Statements of the Problem: Identifying why a Study is Important
How Do You Identify the Statement of the Problem in a Research Study?
Locate the Statement of the Problem in the Introduction Section
Identify the Problem That Needs to Be Solved
Distinguish the Research Problem From the Study’s Topic and Purpose
Why Do Researchers Need to Study Research Problems?
How Do You Distinguish Between the Types of Research Problems Found in Quantitative and Qualitative Studies?
Quantitative Research Is Used When the Research Problem Calls for Explanation
Qualitative Research Is Used When the Research Problem Calls for Exploration
How Do You Understand the Elements of a Study’s Statement of the Problem?
Find the Topic
Identify the Research Problem
Note the Justification for the Importance of the Problem
Identify the Knowledge About the Problem That Is Missing
Note the Audiences Who Will Benefit From the Knowledge Generated by the Study
Consider the Five Elements to Understand a Study’s Statement of the Problem Passage
How Do You Evaluate the Statement of the Problem in a Research Study?
Reviewing What You’ve Learned To Do
Reading Research Articles
Understanding Research Articles
Evaluating Research Articles
An Example of Quantitative Research: The Bullying-Intervention Study
Using social norms to reduce bullying: A research intervention among adolescents in five middle schools
Keywords
Introduction
Conformity to peer norms
Misperceived norms and the social norms approach to reducing problem behavior
Method
Participants
Survey procedures
Measures
Intervention
Analytic approach
Results
Baseline findings
Pre/postintervention comparisons
Exposure to poster message intervention
Discussion
References
Biographical notes
Chapter 4 Literature Reviews: Examining the Background for a Study
How Do You Identify the Literature Review in a Research Study?
Look for the Literature Review in a Stand-Alone Section
Note Where Researchers Refer to Others’ Work from the Literature
How Do Researchers Use Literature in Their Studies?
Literature Provides a Justification for the Research Problem
Literature Documents What Is and Is Not Known About the Topic
Literature Identifies the Theory or Conceptual Framework Behind a Study
Researchers Use Theories to Identify Key Variables and Expected Relationships Among Them.
Researchers Use Conceptual Frameworks to Inform Their Assumptions and Beliefs About the Topic Under Study.
Literature Provides Models for the Methods and Procedures Used in a Study
Literature Helps Researchers Interpret Their Results
How Does the Use of Literature Differ in Quantitative and Qualitative Studies?
The Use of Literature Is More Prescriptive and Static in Quantitative Research
The Use of Literature Is More Informative and Dynamic in Qualitative Research
What Are the Steps That You Can Use to Review the Literature?
Step 1—Identify Key Terms Related to the Topic of the Literature Review
Step 2—Search Databases Using the Key Terms to Locate Literature
Use Academic Libraries to Find an Introduction to Your Topic.
Search Electronic Databases to Find Research Articles on Your Topic.
Step 3—Select Literature That Is Relevant and of Good Quality
Determining Whether a Source Is Relevant.
Determining Whether a Source Is Good Quality.
Step 4—Take Notes on the Key Aspects of Each Selected Source
How Do You Synthesize Literature and Write a Literature Review?
Step 1—Organize the Literature into Themes
Step 2—Write a Summary of the Major Themes
Step 3—Document the Sources by Including Citations to the Literature
Step 4—Provide Your Conclusions About the Literature
How Do You Evaluate a Literature Review in a Research Study?
Reviewing What You’ve Learned To Do
Reading Research Articles
Understanding Research Articles
Evaluating Research Articles
An Example of Qualitative Research: The Adolescent-Homelessness Study
Homelessness and Health in Adolescents
Keywords:
Background and Significance
Literature Review
Homeless Youth
Health Sequelae Associated With Homelessness
Barriers to Care
Unique Challenges Faced by Homeless Adolescent Women
Sexual Victimization
Health
Summary and Critique of the Literature
The Contemporary Policy Context
Ontario Works Act
Purpose of the Study and Research Questions
Method
Design
Sample
Data Collection Procedures
Data Analysis
Findings
“You’re Just Stuck”: The Realities of Exiting Street Life
“I Can’t Really Feel Safe”: Negotiating Dangerous Terrain
“They’re in the Same Situation as You”: Rethinking Family
“More Things Can Happen to You”: The Hazards of Being Female
“It Takes a Toll on You”: The Elusive Nature of Health and the Health Care System
Homelessness and the Public Policy Context
Discussion
Implications
Limitations
Conclusion
References
Chapter 5 Purpose Statements, Research Questions, and Hypotheses: Identifying the Intent of a Study
How Do You Identify the Purpose in a Research Study?
Identify the Study’s Purpose Statement First
Look for Research Questions That Narrow the Study’s Purpose
Look for Hypotheses That Narrow the Study’s Purpose to Predictions
How Does the Purpose Differ in Quantitative and Qualitative Studies?
Quantitative Researchers Specify Purposes That Are Specific and Narrow
Qualitative Researchers Specify Purposes That Are Broad and General
How Do You Identify Variables in Quantitative Research?
Variables Are the Measurement of Constructs
Variables Are Connected to Other Variables Through Theories
Researchers Study Dependent, Independent, Control, and Confounding Variables
What Do You Think?
How Do You Understand Purpose Statements, Research Questions, and Hypotheses in Quantitative Research?
Read Purpose Statements to Learn the Overall Quantitative Intent
Read Quantitative Research Questions to Learn How the Researcher Narrows the Overall Intent Into Specific Questions
Read Quantitative Hypotheses to Learn How the Researcher Narrows the Overall Intent Into Specific Predictions
How Do You Identify a Central Phenomenon in Qualitative Research?
A Central Phenomenon Is a Concept, Activity, or Process
Researchers Study a Central Phenomenon to Learn About Its Meaning and Complexity
How Do You Understand Purpose Statements and Research Questions in Qualitative Research?
Read Purpose Statements to Learn the Study’s Overall Qualitative Intent
Read the Central Research Question and Subquestions to Learn How the Researcher Narrows the Overall Intent Into Specific Questions
How Do You Evaluate the Purpose in a Research Study?
Reviewing What You’ve Learned To Do
Reading Research Articles
Understanding Research Articles
Evaluating Research Articles
Part III Understanding the Method Sections and Results Sections of Quantitative Research Reports
Chapter 6 Quantitative Research Designs: Recognizing the Overall Plan for a Study
How Do You Identify the Research Design in a Quantitative Study?
What Characteristics Distinguish the Different Research Designs Used in Quantitative Studies?
How Do You Understand Five Common Quantitative Research Designs?
The True Experiment Research Design
Researchers Use True Experiments When They Need to Be Certain That a Treatment Causes an Effect.
Identifying the Characteristics of a True Experiment in a Research Report.
An Example of a True Experiment Study.
The Quasi-Experiment Research Design
Researchers Use Quasi-Experiments to Determine the Effect of a Treatment for Intact Groups.
Identifying the Characteristics of a Quasi-Experiment in a Research Report.
An Example of a Quasi-Experiment Research Study.
The Single-Subject Research Design
Researchers Use Single-Subject Designs When They Want to Affect an Individual.
Identifying the Characteristics of Single-Subject Research in a Research Report.
An Example of a Single-Subject Research Study.
The Correlational Research Design
Researchers Use Correlational Research When They Need to Describe the Relationships Among Variables.
Identifying the Characteristics of Correlational Research in a Research Report.
An Example of a Correlational Research Study.
The Survey Research Design
Researchers Use Survey Research When They Need to Describe Trends in a Population.
Identifying the Characteristics of a Survey Research Design in a Research Report.
An Example of a Survey Research Study.
How Do You Recognize the Research Design in a Quantitative Research Report?
How Do You Evaluate the Research Design in a Quantitative Study?
Reviewing What You’ve Learned To Do
Reading Research Articles
Understanding Research Articles
Evaluating Research Articles
An Example of Quantitative Research: The Early-Intervention-Outcomes Study
Measuring Family Outcomes in Early Intervention: Findings From a Large-Scale Assessment
Method
Participants
Family and Child Instruments
Procedures
Results
Outcomes Reported ky Families
Program Features
Associations Among Reported Outcomes
Factors Associated With Family Outcomes
Discussion
Summary of Major Findings
Uses of the Family Outcomes Survey
Limitations
Future Research
References
About the Authors
Chapter 7 Participants and Data Collection: Identifying How Quantitative Information is Gathered
How Do You Identify the Participants and Data Collection in a Quantitative Study?
Participants
Procedure
Instruments
Look for Information About the Sites and Participants
Note the General Procedures for Collecting Data
Identify the Instruments Used to Gather Quantitative Data
How Do You Understand the Selection of Sites and Participants in a Quantitative Study?
Identify the Population and Sample
Determine the Sampling Strategy That Was Used
Determine Whether the Sample Included a Large Number of Participants
How Do You Understand the Instruments Used to Gather Data in a Quantitative Study?
Identify How the Researcher Specified the Variables
Identify the Type of Instrument Used to Gather Information
Assess the Evidence That the Researcher Used a Good Instrument
How Do You Understand the Procedures That Researchers Use to Collect Quantitative Data?
Note Indicators That the Procedures Were Ethical
Expect the Data Collection Procedures to Be Standardized
Identify How the Researchers Reduced Threats to the Studies’ Conclusions
Procedures That Researchers Use to Increase a Study’s Internal Validity.
Procedures That Researchers Use to Increase a Study’s External Validity.
How Do You Evaluate the Participants and Data Collection in a Quantitative Study?
Reviewing What You’ve Learned To Do
Reading Research Articles
Understanding Research Articles
Evaluating Research Articles
Chapter 8 Data Analysis and Results: Examining What was Found in a Quantitative Study
How Do You Identify the Data Analysis and Results in a Quantitative Study?
Look to the Method Section for a General Description of the Quantitative Data Analysis Process
Examine the Results Section to Find the Quantitative Results for the Study’s Research Questions and Hypotheses
How Do You Understand a Study’s Quantitative Data Analysis?
Step 1—Identify How the Researchers Scored the Data
Step 2—Note How the Researchers Prepared the Quantitative Data for Analysis
Step 3—Recognize How the Researchers Used Descriptive Statistics to Answer Descriptive Research Questions
The Use of Descriptive Statistics to Describe Central Tendency.
The Use of Descriptive Statistics to Describe Variability.
The Use of Descriptive Statistics to Describe Relative Standing.
Step 4—Identify How the Researchers Used Inferential Statistics to Answer Comparison and Relationship Research Questions
How Do You Understand the Results in a Quantitative Study?
First—Examine Tables to Learn a Summary of Major Results
Understanding Tables Used to Describe Participants’ Demographics.
Understanding Tables Used to Compare Groups.
Understanding Tables Used to Relate Variables.
Second—Examine Figures to Learn How Variables Are Related
Understanding Graphical Figures Used to Display Results.
Third—Read the Detailed Explanations of the Results in the Text
How Do You Evaluate the Data Analysis and Results in a Quantitative Study?
Reviewing What You’ve Learned To Do
Reading Research Articles
Understanding Research Articles
Evaluating Research Articles
Part IV Understanding the Method Sections and Results Sections of Qualitative Research Reports
Chapter 9 Qualitative Research Designs: Recognizing the Overall Plan for a Study
How Do You Identify the Research Design in a Qualitative Study?
What Characteristics Distinguish the Different Research Designs Used in Qualitative Studies?
How Do You Understand Four Common Qualitative Research Designs?
The Narrative Research Design
Researchers Use Narrative Research to Describe Individuals’ Lives Over Time.
Identifying the Characteristics of Narrative Research in a Research Report.
An Example of a Narrative Research Study.
The Case Study Research Design
Researchers Use Case Study Research to Describe What Happens in a Case.
Identifying the Characteristics of Case Study Research in a Research Report.
An Example of a Case Study Research Study.
The Ethnographic Research Design
Researchers Use Ethnographic Research to Explore a Group’s Culture.
Identifying the Characteristics of Ethnographic Research in a Research Report.
An Example of an Ethnographic Research Study.
The Grounded Theory Research Design
Researchers Use Grounded Theory to Develop a Theory.
Identifying the Characteristics of Grounded Theory Research in a Research Report.
An Example of a Grounded Theory Research Study.
How Do You Recognize the Research Design in a Qualitative Research Report?
How Do You Evaluate the Research Design in a Qualitative Study?
Reviewing What You’ve Learned To Do
Reading Research Articles
Understanding Research Articles
Evaluating Research Articles
An Example of Qualitative Research: The Adoption-of-Pedagogical-Tools Study
Special Education Preservice Teachers Appropriation of Pedagogical Tools for Teaching Reading
Activity Theory as a Framework for Understanding the Complexities of Preservice teacher Learning
Activity Theory Applied to General Education Teacher Learning
Method
Participants
Reading Course Work in the Preparation Program
Data Collection
Data Analysis
Verification
Findings
Melanie
Colleen
Tricia
Anita
Kristy
Nancy
Core Concept: Opportunities to Appropriate Knowledge in Practice
Component Concept: Personal Qualities
Component Concept: Motivation . for Knowledge Assimilation
Component Concept: Access to Knowledge
The Grounded Theory
Discussion
Implications
References
About the Authors
Chapter 10 Participants and Data Collection: Identifying How Qualitative Information is Gathered
How Do You Identify the Participants and Data Collection in a Qualitative Study?
Look for Information About the Sites and Participants
Identify the Types of Qualitative Data Gathered
Discern the Procedures Used to Gather the Data
Note the Issues Related to Collecting Data
How Do You Understand the Selection of Sites and Participants in a Qualitative Study?
Sites and Participants Are Purposefully Selected
Specific Strategies Guide the Purposeful Sampling
A Small Number of Sites and Participants Are Selected
What Types of Qualitative Data Do Researchers Collect?
How Do You Understand the Common Qualitative Data Collection Procedures?
Procedures for Qualitative Interviews
Examine Why the Researcher Chose to Collect Interviews.
Identify the Specific Type of Interview.
Note the Way the Researcher Organizes the Interview Questions.
Note How the Researcher Recorded the Data During the Interview.
Procedures for Qualitative Observations
Examine Why the Researcher Chose to Collect Observations.
Look for the Researcher’s Role as an Observer.
Note How Researchers Record Observational Field Notes.
Assess Whether Researchers Conducted Multiple Observations Over Time.
Procedures for the Collection of Documents
Procedures for the Collection of Audiovisual Materials
How Do You Understand the Issues That Are Reported About Qualitative Data Collection?
Pay Attention to How the Researchers Handled Ethical Issues
Learn About the Challenges That Occurred in Gaining Access and Gathering Data
How Do You Evaluate the Participants and Data Collection in a Qualitative Study?
Reviewing What You’ve Learned To Do
Reading Research Articles
Understanding Research Articles
Evaluating Research Articles
Chapter 11 Data Analysis and Findings: Examining what was Found in a Qualitative Study
How Do You Identify the Data Analysis and Findings in a Qualitative Study?
Look to the Method Section for an Overview of the Qualitative Analysis Process
Look to the Results Section for the Qualitative Findings Produced by the Analysis Process
How Do You Understand a Study’s Qualitative Data Analysis?
Step 1—Identify How the Researchers Prepared Their Data
Step 2—Note Whether the Researchers Explored Their Data
Step 3—Discern the Researchers’ Use of Coding
Step 4—Examine How the Researchers Refined Their Codes and Used Them to Build Their Results
Researchers Build Description.
Researchers Build Themes.
Researchers Relate Multiple Themes.
Step 5—Identify the Strategies the Researchers Used to Validate Their Results
How Do You Understand the Findings in a Qualitative Study?
Read Descriptive Findings to Learn the Context of the Study and the Central Phenomenon
Examine Themes to Learn the Larger Ideas Found About the Study’s Central Phenomenon
Read Tables and Figures to Learn More About the Details and Complexity of the Findings
Consider the Form of the Findings in Relation to the Research Design
How Do You Evaluate the Data Analysis and Findings in a Qualitative Study?
Reviewing What You’ve Learned To Do
Reading Research Articles
Understanding Research Articles
Evaluating Research Articles
Part V Understanding Reports That Combine Quantitative and Qualitative Research
Chapter 12 Mixed Methods Research Designs: Studies that Mix Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches
How Do You Determine Whether a Study Used Mixed Methods Research?
Note Key Terms That Signal the Use of Mixed Methods
Note the Collection and Analysis of Both Quantitative and Qualitative Data
When Is It Appropriate for Researchers to Have Used Mixed Methods Research in Their Studies?
Mixed Methods Is Appropriate If the Researcher Needed to Combine the Strengths of Quantitative and Qualitative Data
Mixed Methods Is Appropriate If the Researcher Needed to Build From One Type of Data to the Other
Mixed Methods Is Appropriate If the Researcher Needed to Answer Two Questions
What Characteristics Distinguish the Different Mixed Methods Designs?
Mixed Methods Designs Differ in Terms of Their Timing
Mixed Methods Designs Differ in Terms of Their Priority
Mixed Methods Designs Differ in Terms of Their Mixing
How Do You Understand the Common Mixed Methods Research Designs?
The Convergent Parallel Mixed Methods Design
Studies Using the Convergent Parallel Design Develop Valid and Complete Conclusions About a Topic.
Identifying the Characteristics of the Convergent Parallel Design in a Research Report.
An Example of the Convergent Parallel Design.
The Sequential Explanatory Mixed Methods Design
Studies Using the Sequential Explanatory Design Explain Quantitative Results with Qualitative Data.
Identifying the Characteristics of the Sequential Explanatory Design in a Research Report.
An Example of the Sequential Explanatory Design.
The Sequential Exploratory Mixed Methods Design
Studies Using the Sequential Exploratory Design Generalize Qualitative Results with Quantitative Data.
Identifying the Characteristics of the Sequential Exploratory Design in a Research Report.
An Example of the Sequential Exploratory Design.
The Embedded Mixed Methods Design
Studies Using the Embedded Design Enhance a Larger Study with a Secondary Dataset.
Identifying the Characteristics of the Embedded Design in a Research Report.
An Example of the Embedded Design.
How Do You Evaluate a Mixed Methods Research Study?
Reviewing What You’ve Learned To Do
Reading Research Articles
Understanding Research Articles
Evaluating Research Articles
An Example of Mixed Methods Research: The Student-Note-Taking Study
Individual Differences and Intervention Flaws A Sequential Explanatory Study of College Students’ Copy-and-Paste Note Taking
Keywords:
The Preference to Paste
How Copying and Pasting Notes Affects Learning From Text
Quantitative Phase
Hypothesis and Prediction
Method
Materials
Procedure
Results
Multivariate Analysis of Variance
Fact Test ANOVA
Relational Inferences ANOVA
Conceptual Recognition ANOVA
Need for Follow-up Explanations
Qualitative Phase
Note-Taking Data Collection and Analysis
Interview Data Collection and Analysis
Organization of the Interview Data
Explanation of Themes
Drawing Conclusions, Data Mixing, and Instructional Impact
Contribution to Mixed Methods Literature
Limitations
Future Research
References
Chapter 13 Action Research Designs: Studies that Solve Practical Problems
How Do You Identify That a Study Used Action Research?
Recognize That Action Researchers Include Practitioners
Identify That the Focus Is on a Real Problem in a Local Setting
Notice That the Action Researcher Used a Cyclical Process of Research
How Do You Understand Action Research Designs?
The Practical Action Research Design
Practitioners Use Practical Action Research to Solve Local Problems.
Practical Action Research Reports Describe a Spiral Approach to the Process of Research.
Identifying the Characteristics of the Practical Action Research Design in a Research Report.
An Example of a Practical Action Research Study.
The Participatory Action Research (PAR) Design
Researchers Use PAR to Improve the Quality of People’s Lives.
PAR Reports Describe a Social Research Process Emphasizing Collaboration.
Identifying the Characteristics of the PAR Design in a Research Report.
An Example of a PAR Study.
How Do You Plan Your Own Action Research Study?
Step 1—Determine Whether Action Research Is Possible in Your Setting and With Your Colleagues
Step 2—Specify the Problem You Want to Study
Step 3—Locate Resources to Help You Address the Problem
Step 4—Identify Information You Need to Examine the Problem
Step 5—Implement the Data Collection
Step 6—Analyze the Data
Step 7—Develop a Plan for Action
Step 8—Implement the Plan and Reflect
How Do You Evaluate an Action Research Study?
Reviewing What You’ve Learned To Do
Reading Research Articles
Understanding Research Articles
Evaluating Research Articles
An Example of Action Research: The Learning-by-Talking Study
How trainee music teachers learn about teaching by talking to each other: An action research study
Keywords
Conversation as a means of learning
Methods
Reconnaissance
Intervention
Findings
Trainees offered several solutions to the problem
Trainees offered reasons for their ideas
Trainees tried to understand other people’s ideas
Trainees signalled agreements with each other
Trainees disagreed with, or challenged each other
Trainees built on each others’ ideas
Trainees’ perspectives
Reflections
References
Author biography
Abstracts
Part VI Understanding the Final Sections of Research Reports
Chapter 14 Conclusions: Identifying the Interpretations and Implications of a Study
How Do You Identify the Conclusions and Supporting Information in a Study Report?
Look for the Conclusion Section to Learn How the Researcher Interpreted and Evaluated the Study
Read the Back Matter to Find Supporting Information for the Study Report
How Do You Understand the Elements Discussed in a Study’s Conclusion Section?
A Summary of the Major Results
Relating the Results to Other Literature
The Personal Interpretation of the Researcher
Implications for Practice
The Limitations of the Present Study
Future Research Needs
The Overall Significance of the Study
How Are Conclusions Similar and Different Among the Different Research Approaches?
What Information Is Included in the Back Matter of a Research Report?
End Notes
References
Author Notes
Appendices
How Do You Evaluate the Conclusions and Back Matter in a Research Report?
Reviewing What You’ve Learned To Do
Reading Research Articles
Understanding Research Articles
Evaluating Research Articles
Appendix Example of a Paper Written in the APA Style
A Guide to Key Features for Writing Papers in the APA Style
Glossary
References
Name Index
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
Subject Index
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
Z
Free Sample Test bank For Understanding Research A Consumers Guide 2nd Edition by Vicki L. Plano Clark

For customer’s satisfaction, we provide free samples for any required Textbook solution or test bank to check and evaluate before making the final purchase..

If you require any further information, let me know. using Live Chat or Contact Us

Test bank For Understanding Research A Consumers Guide 2nd Edition by Vicki L. Plano Clark