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Test bank For Through Womens Eyes An American History with Documents 4th Edition by Ellen Carol DuBois

Test bank For Through Womens Eyes An American History with Documents 4th Edition by Ellen Carol DuBois

Through Women’s Eyes: An American History with Documents was the first text to present a narrative of U.S. women’s history within the context of the central developments of the United States and to combine this core narrative with written and visual primary sources in each chapter. The authors’ commitment to highlighting the best and most current scholarship, along with their focus on women from a broad range of ethnicities, classes, religions, and regions, has helped students really understand U.S. history Through Women’s Eyes.

Table of Contents

CONTENTS

PREFACE FOR INSTRUCTORS

SPECIAL FEATURES

INTRODUCTION FOR STUDENTS

CHAPTER 1 America in the World: To 1650

NATIVE AMERICAN WOMEN

Indigenous Peoples before 1492

The Pueblo Peoples

Reading into the Past Two Sisters and Acoma Origins

The Iroquois Confederacy

Native Women’s Worlds

Reading into the Past CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS, Letter to Lord Raphael Sánchez, Treasurer to Ferdinand and Isabella

EUROPEANS ARRIVE

Early Spanish Expansion

Spain’s Northern Frontier

Fish and Furs in the North

Early British Settlements

AFRICAN WOMEN AND THE ATLANTIC SLAVE TRADE

Women in West Africa

The Early Slave Trade

Racializing Slavery

African Slavery in the Americas

CONCLUSION: MANY BEGINNINGS

PRIMARY SOURCES: European Images of Native American Women

Theodor Galle, America (c. 1580) • Indians Planting Corn, from Theodor de Bry, Great Voyages (1590) • Canadian Iroquois Women Making Maple Sugar, from Joseph-François Lafitau, Moeurs des Sauvages Amériquains (1724) • John White, Theire sitting at meate (c. 1585–1586) • John White, A Chief Lady of Pomeiooc and Her Daughter • John White, Indians Dancing Around a Circle of Posts (1590) • John White, Eskimo Woman (1577) • Pocahontas Convinces Her Father, Chief Powhatan, to Spare the Life of Captain John Smith, from John Smith, Generall Historie of Virginia (1624) • Pocahontas (1616)

CHAPTER 2 Colonial Worlds, 1607–1750

SOUTHERN BRITISH COLONIES

British Women in the South

Reading into the Past The Trappan’d Maiden: or, The Distressed Damsel

African Women

NORTHERN BRITISH COLONIES

The Puritan Search for Order: The Family and the Law

Disorderly Women

Reading into the Past Trial of Anne Hutchinson

Women’s Work and Consumption Patterns

Dissenters from Dissenters: Women in Pennsylvania

Reading into the Past JANE FENN HOSKENS, Quaker Preacher

OTHER EUROPES/OTHER AMERICAS

New Netherland

New France

New Spain

CONCLUSION: THE DIVERSITY OF AMERICAN WOMEN

PRIMARY SOURCES: By and About Colonial Women

Letters: ELIZA LUCAS PINCKNEY, To Miss Bartlett • ELIZABETH SPRIGS, To Mr. John Sprigs White Smith in White Cross Street Near Cripple Gate London

Newspaper Advertisements: South Carolina Gazette, Charleston (October 22, 1744) • South Carolina Gazette, Charleston (December 23, 1745)• Boston Gazette (April 28, 1755) • Boston Gazette (June 20, 1735)

Legal Proceedings: Michael Baisey’s Wife (1654) • Judith Catchpole (1656) • Mrs. Agatha Stubbings (1645) • Elizabeth (Tilley) Howland (1686) •Laws on Women and Slavery • Laws of Virginia (1643, 1662)

PRIMARY SOURCES: Depictions of “Family” in Colonial America

Elizabeth Freake and Child • Johannes and Elsie Schuyler • The Potter Family • Mestizo Family • Mulatto Family • Indian Family

CHAPTER 3 Mothers and Daughters of the Revolution, 1750–1800

BACKGROUND TO REVOLUTION, 1754–1775

The Growing Confrontation

Liberty’s Daughters: Women and the Emerging Crisis

Reading into the Past HANNAH GRIFFITS, The Female Patriots, Address’d to the Daughters of Liberty in America

WOMEN AND THE FACE OF WAR, 1775–1783

Choosing Sides: Native American and African American Women

White Women: Pacifists, Tories, and Patriots

Maintaining the Troops: The Women Who Served

Reading into the Past ESTHER DEBERDT REED, Sentiments of an American Woman

REVOLUTIONARY ERA LEGACIES

A Changing World for Native American Women

African American Women: Freedom and Slavery

White Women: An Ambiguous Legacy

Women and Religion: The Great Awakening

CONCLUSION: TO THE MARGINS OF POLITICAL ACTION

PRIMARY SOURCES: Portraits of Revolutionary Women

John Singleton Copley, Mercy Otis Warren (1763) • Scipio Moorhead, Phillis Wheatley (1773) • Susan Anne Livingston Ridley Sedgwick, Elizabeth Freeman (“Mum Bett”) (1811) • Jemima Wilkinson (1816) • Joseph Stone, Deborah Sampson (1797)

PRIMARY SOURCES: Gendering Images of the Revolution

“A Society of Patriotic Ladies” (1774) • Miss Fanny’s Maid (1770) • “Banner of Washington’s Life Guard” (date unknown) • Edward Savage, “Liberty in the Form of the Goddess of Youth Giving Support to the Bald Eagle” (1796) • Samuel Jennings, Liberty Displaying the Arts and Sciences (1792)

PRIMARY SOURCES: Phillis Wheatley, Poet and Slave Letters • To Arbour Tanner • To Rev. Samson Occom Poems • On Being Brought from Africa to America • To the Right Honourable William, Earl of Dartmouth, His Majesty’s Principal Secretary of State for North America

PRIMARY SOURCES: Education and Republican Motherhood

“A Peculiar Mode of Education” • BENJAMIN RUSH, Thoughts upon Female Education (1787) • “All That Independence Which Is Proper to Humanity”

JUDITH SARGENT MURRAY, Observations of Female Abilities (1798)

CHAPTER 4 Pedestal, Loom, and Auction Block, 1800–1860

THE IDEOLOGY OF TRUE WOMANHOOD

Christian Motherhood

Reading into the Past CATHARINE BEECHER, The Peculiar Responsibilities of the American Woman

A Middle-Class Ideology

Domesticity in a Market Age

WOMEN AND WAGE EARNING

From Market Revolution to Industrial Revolution

The Mill Girls of Lowell

The End of the Lowell Idyll

At the Bottom of the Wage Economy

WOMEN AND SLAVERY

Plantation Patriarchy

Plantation Mistresses

Non-Elite White Women

Slave Women

Reading into the Past MARY BOYKIN CHESNUT, Slavery a Curse to Any Land

Reading into the Past HARRIET JACOBS, Trials of Girlhood

Reading into the Past BELOVED CHILDREN, Cherokee Women Petition the National Council

CONCLUSION: TRUE WOMANHOOD AND THE REALITY OF WOMEN’S LIVES

PRIMARY SOURCE Prostitution in New York City, 1858

WILLIAM W. SANGER, The History of Prostitution: Its Extent, Causes, and Effects throughout the World (1858)

PRIMARY SOURCES: Two Slave Love Stories

WILLIAM AND ELLEN CRAFT, Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom; or, The Escape of William and Ellen Craft from Slavery (1860) • POLLY SHINE, WPA Interview (1938)

PRIMARY SOURCES: Godey’s Lady’s Book

The Constant, or the Anniversary Present (1851) • The Teacher (1844) • Purity (1850) • Cooks (1852) • Shoe Shopping (1848)

PRIMARY SOURCES: Early Photographs of Factory Operatives and Slave Women

Four Women Mill Workers (1860) • Two Women Mill Workers (1860) • Amoskeag Manufacturing Company Workers (1854) • The Hayward Family’s Slave Louisa with Her Legal Owner (c. 1858) • Thomas Easterly, Family with Their Slave Nurse (c. 1850) • Timothy O’Sullivan, Plantation in Beaufort, South Carolina (1862)

CHAPTER 5 Shifting Boundaries: Expansion, Reform, and Civil War, 1840–1865

AN EXPANDING NATION, 1843–1861

Overland by Trail

The Underside of Expansion: Native Women and Californianas

The Gold Rush

ANTEBELLUM REFORM

Expanding Woman’s Sphere: Maternal, Moral, and Temperance Reform

Exploring New Territory: Radical Reform in Family and Sexual Life

Crossing Political Boundaries: Abolitionism

Reading into the Past MARIA STEWART, On Religion and Morality

Entering New Territory: Women’s Rights

Reading into the Past SOJOURNER TRUTH, I Am as Strong as Any Man

CIVIL WAR, 1861–1865

Women and the Impending Crisis

Reading into the Past HARRIET BEECHER STOWE, Reflections on Uncle Tom’s Cabin

Women’s Involvement in the War

Emancipation

CONCLUSION: RESHAPING BOUNDARIES, REDEFINING WOMANHOOD

PRIMARY SOURCES: Dame Shirley’s Letters: A Woman’s Gold Rush

LOUISE SMITH CLAPPE, Letter the First: Rich Bar, East Branch of the North Fork of Feather River, September 13, 1851 • Letter the Second: September 15, 1851 • Letter the Tenth: From our Log Cabin, Indian Bar [a nearby camp], November 25, 1851 • Letter the Fourteenth: March 15, 1852 • Letter the Seventeenth: May 25, 1852 • Letter the Eighteenth: July 5, 1852 • Letter the Nineteenth: August 4, 1852 • Letter Twenty-Second: October 22, 1852

PRIMARY SOURCES: A Women’s Rights Partnership: Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony in the 1850s and 1860s

Elizabeth Cady Stanton Recalls Meeting Susan B. Anthony (1881) • Anthony to Stanton, Rochester (1856) • Anthony to Stanton, Home-getting, along towards 12 o’clock (1856) • Stanton to Anthony, Seneca Falls (1856) • Susan B. Anthony, Why the Sexes Should be Educated Together (1856) • Susan B. Anthony, “Make the Slave’s Case Our Own” (1859) • Elizabeth Cady Stanton, To the American Anti-Slavery Society (1860) • Stanton and Anthony, “Call for a Meeting of the Loyal Women of the Nation” (1863)

PRIMARY SOURCES: Women on the Civil War Battlefields

F. O. C. Darley, Midnight on the Battlefield (1890) • William Ludwell Sheppard, In the Hospital (1861) • Sisters of Charity with Doctors and Soldiers, Satterlee Hospital, Philadelphia (c. 1863) • Susie King Taylor • Harriet Tubman • Rose O’Neal Greenhow in the Old Capitol Prison with Her Daughter (1862) • F. O. C. Darley, A Woman in Battle — “Michigan Bridget” Carrying the Flag (1888) • Madam Velazquez in Female Attire and Harry T. Buford, 1st Lieutenant, Independent Scouts, Confederate States Army

CHAPTER 6 Reconstructing Women’s Lives North and South, 1865–1900

GENDER AND THE POSTWAR CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS

Constitutionalizing Women’s Rights

A New Departure for Woman Suffrage

Reading into the Past SUSAN B. ANTHONY, Not One Is My Peer, All Are My Political Sovereigns

WOMEN’S LIVES IN SOUTHERN RECONSTRUCTION AND REDEMPTION

Black Women in the New South

White Women in the New South

Racial Conflict in Slavery’s Aftermath

FEMALE WAGE LABOR AND THE TRIUMPH OF INDUSTRIAL CAPITALISM

Women’s Occupations after the Civil War

Who Were the Women Wage Earners?

Responses to Working Women

Class Conflict and Labor Organization

Reading into the Past LEONORA BARRY, Women in the Knights of Labor

WOMEN OF THE LEISURED CLASSES

New Sources of Wealth and Leisure

Reading into the Past HARRIOT STANTON BLATCH, Voluntary Motherhood

The “Woman’s Era”

The Woman’s Christian Temperance Union

Consolidating the Gilded Age Women’s Movement

Looking to the Future

CONCLUSION: TOWARD A NEW WOMANHOOD

PRIMARY SOURCES: Ida B. Wells, “Race Woman”

Crusade for Justice: The Autobiography of Ida B. Wells (1970)

PRIMARY SOURCES: The Woman Who Toils

MRS.JOHN (BESSIE) VAN VORST AND MARIE VAN VORST, The Woman Who Toils: Being the Experiences of Two Ladies as Factory Girls (1903)

PRIMARY SOURCES: The Higher Education of Women in the Postbellum Years

Women Students Models Senior Plugs, University of California (c. 1900) • Class in Zoology, Wellesley College (1883–1884) • Basketball Team, Wells College (1904) • Class in American History, Hampton Institute (1899–1900) • Science Class, Washington, D.C., Normal College (1899) • Graduating Class, Medical College of Syracuse University (1876)

PRIMARY SOURCES: The New Woman

What We Are Coming To? (1898) • In a Twentieth Century Club (1895) • Picturesque America (1900) • The Scorcher (1897) • Nellie Bly on the Fly (1890) •Women Bachelors in New York (1896)

CHAPTER 7 Women in an Expanding Nation: Consolidation of the West, Mass Immigration, and the Crisis of the 1890s

CONSOLIDATING THE WEST

Native Women in the West

Reading into the Past HELEN HUNT JACKSON, Ramona

The Family West

The “Wild West”

LATE NINETEENTH-CENTURY IMMIGRATION

The Decision to Immigrate

Reading into the Past EMMA GOLDMAN, Living My Life

The Immigrant’s Journey

Reception of the Immigrants

Immigrant Daughters

Immigrant Wives and Mothers

CENTURY’S END: CHALLENGES, CONFLICT, AND IMPERIAL VENTURES

Rural Protest, Populism, and the Battle for Woman Suffrage

Class Conflict and the Pullman Strike of 1894

The Settlement House Movement

Epilogue to the Crisis: The Spanish-American War of 1898

Reading into the Past CLEMENCIA LOPEZ, Women of the Philippines

CONCLUSION: NATIONHOOD AND WOMANHOOD ON THE EVE OF A NEW CENTURY

PRIMARY SOURCES: Zitkala-Ša: Indian Girlhood and Education

American Indian Stories (1921)

PRIMARY SOURCES: Jane Addams: Twenty Years at Hull House

Twenty Years at Hull-House (1910)

PRIMARY SOURCES: Jacob Riis’s Photographs of Immigrant Girls and Women

In the Home of an Italian Ragpicker: Jersey Street • Knee Pants at Forty-Five Cents a Dozen — A Ludlow Street Sweater’s Shop • Police Station Lodgers: Women’s Lodging Room in the West 47th Street Station • “I Scrubs”: Katie Who Keeps House on West 49th Street

PRIMARY SOURCES: Women at the World’s Columbian Exposition, 1893

Lydia Emmet, Art, Science, and Literature • Tanners of the Plains • Dahomey Women • The Johnson Family Visit the Dahomey Village • Cairo Street Waltz • Annie Oakley

CHAPTER 8 Power and Politics: Women in the Progressive Era, 1900–1920

The Female Labor Force

CONTINUITY AND CHANGE FOR WOMEN WAGE EARNERS

Organizing Women Workers: The Women’s Trade Union League

The Rising of the Women

THE FEMALE DOMINION

Public Housekeeping

Reading into the Past: MARY BEARD, Municipal Housekeeping

Maternalist Triumphs: Protective Labor Legislation and Mothers’ Pensions

Maternalist Defeat: The Struggle to Ban Child Labor

Progressive Women and Political Parties

Outside the Dominion: Progressivism and Race

VOTES FOR WOMEN

A New Generation for Suffrage

Diversity in the Woman Suffrage Movement

Returning to the Constitution: The National Suffrage Movement

THE EMERGENCE OF FEMINISM

The Feminist Program

The Birth Control Movement

THE GREAT WAR, 1914–1918

Pacifist and Antiwar Women

Preparedness and Patriotism

The Great Migration

Reading into the Past: Black Women Talk About the Great Migration

Winning Woman Suffrage

CONCLUSION: NEW CONDITIONS, NEW CHALLENGES

PRIMARY SOURCES: Black Women and Progressive-era Reform

LUGENIA BURNS HOPE, “The Neighborhood Union: Atlanta Georgia” (c. 1908) • IDA B. WELLS-BARNETT, “The East St. Louis Massacre: The Greatest Outrage of the Century” (1917) • SAVANNAH (Georgia) CITY COLOERD WOMEN’S CLUB, Resolution the Lynching of Mary Turner (1918) • NANNIE BURROUGHS, “Black Women and the Suffrage” (1915) • MARY CHURCH TERRELL, “International Peace Movement” (1915?)

PRIMARY SOURCES: Parades, Picketing, and Power: Women in Public Space

“Girl Strikers,” New York Evening Journal (November 10, 1909) • Members of the Rochester, New York, Branch of the Garment Workers Union (1913) • Suffragists Marching down Fifth Avenue, New York City (1913) • Suffrage Parade down Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D.C. (March 1913) • National Woman’s Party Picketers at the White House (1918) • Protest against the East St. Louis Riots, New York City (1917)

PRIMARY SOURCES: Uncle Sam Wants You: Women and World War I Posters

“Let’s End It — Quick with Liberty Bonds” • “It’s Up To You. Protect the Nation’s Honor. Enlist Now” • “Gee!! I Wish I Were a Man. I’d Join the Navy” • “The Woman’s Land Army of America Training School” • “For Every Fighter a Woman Worker. Y.W.C.A.”

CHAPTER 9 Change and Continuity: Women in Prosperity, Depression, and War, 1920–1945

PROSPERITY DECADE: THE 1920S

The New Woman in Politics

Reading into the Past: Alice Paul, Arguing for the ERA

Reading into the Past: Mary Van Kleeck, Arguing against the ERA

Women at Work

The New Woman in the Home

DEPRESSION DECADE: THE 1930S

At Home in Hard Times

Women and Work

Women’s New Deal

WORKING FOR VICTORY: WOMEN AND WAR, 1941–1945

Women in the Military

Working Women in Wartime

War and Everyday Life

CONCLUSION: THE NEW WOMAN IN IDEAL AND REALITY

PRIMARY SOURCES: Beauty Culture Between the Wars

“Can You Tell Us Her Name?” (1926) • “Irresistible Lips” (1938) • “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942) • Glorifying Our Womanhood” (1925) • “Queen of Blues Singers” (1923)

PRIMARY SOURCES: Women’s Networks in the New Deal

ELEANOR ROOSEVELT, “Women in Politics” (1940) • ROSE SCHNEIDERMAN, All for One (1967) • MOLLY DEWSON, “An Aid to an End” (1949) • MARY MCLEOD BETHUNE, Proceedings of the Second National Youth Administration Advisory Committee Meeting (1936) • MARY MCLEOD BETHUNE, Letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt (1940)

PRIMARY SOURCES: Dorothea Lange Photographs Farm Women of the Great Depression

Migrant Mother #1 (1936) • Migrant Mother #5 (1936) • Migrant Mother #3 (1936) • Unemployed lumber worker goes with his wife to the bean harvest (1939) • “You don’t have to worriate so much and you’ve got time to raise sompin’ to eat.” (1938) • Cotton weighing near Brownsville, Texas (1936) • A Sign of the Times—Depression—Mended Stockings, Stenographer (1934) • Feet of Negro cotton hoer near Clarksdale, Mississippi (1937)

PRIMARY SOURCES: Voices of “Rosie the Riveter”

HORTENSE JOHNSON, “What My Job Means to Me” (1943) • BEATRICE MORALES, Interview (1981) • SYLVIA R. WEISSBORDT, Women Workers and their Postwar Employment Plans (1946)

CHAPTER 10 Beyond the Feminine Mystique: Women’s Lives, 1945–1965

FAMILY CULTURE AND GENDER ROLES

The New Affluence and the Family

The Cold War and the Family

Rethinking the Feminine Mystique

Reading into the Past: Betty Friedan, The Problem That Has No Name

Women and Work

WOMEN’S ACTIVISM IN CONSERVATIVE TIMES

Working-Class Women and Unions

Middle-Class Women and Voluntary Associations

A MASS MOVEMENT FOR CIVIL RIGHTS

Challenging Segregation

Women as “Bridge Leaders”

Voter Registration and Freedom Summer

Reading into the Past: Ella Baker, Bigger Than a Hamburger

Sexism in the Movement

Reading into the Past: Casey Hayden and Mary King, Women in the Movement

A Widening Circle of Civil Rights Activists

WOMEN AND PUBLIC POLICY

The Continuing Battle over the ERA

A Turning Point: The President’s Commission on the Status of Women

CONCLUSION: THE LIMITS OF THE FEMININE MYSTIQUE

PRIMARY SOURCES: Television’s Prescriptions for Women

Advertisement for Motorola Television (1951) • Advertisement for RCA Victor Television (1953) • Advertisement for General Electric Television (1955) • Ladies’ Home Journal Advertisement for NBC (1955) • Advertisement for Betty Crocker (1952) • Scene from Beulah • Scene from Amos ’n’ Andy • Scene from The Goldbergs • Scene from The Honeymooners • Scenes from I Love Lucy • Scene from Father Knows Best

PRIMARY SOURCES: “Is a Working Mother a Threat to the Home?”

Should Mothers of Young Children Work? (1958)

PRIMARY SOURCES: Women in the Civil Rights Movement

Oral Histories

JO ANN ROBINSON • DIANE NASH • VIVIAN LEBURG ROTHSTEIN MARY DORA JONES • EARLINE BOYD

CHAPTER 11 Modern Feminism and American Society, 1965–1980

ROOTS OF SIXTIES FEMINISM

The Legacy of the Civil Rights Movement

NOW and Liberal Feminism

Reading into the Past: National Organization for Women, Women’s Bill of Rights

WOMEN’S LIBERATION AND THE SIXTIES REVOLUTIONS

Sexual Revolution and Counterculture

Black Power and SNCC

The War in Vietnam and SDS

IDEAS AND PRACTICES OF WOMEN’S LIBERATION

Consciousness-Raising

Lesbianism and Sexual Politics

Radical Feminist Theory

DIVERSITY, RACE, AND FEMINISM

African American Women

Latina Activism

Reading into the Past: Johnnie Tillmon, Welfare Is a Woman’s Issue

Asian American Women

Native American Women

Women of Color

THE IMPACT OF FEMINISM

Challenging Discrimination in the Workplace

Equality in Education

Women’s Autonomy over Their Bodies

Changing Public Policy and Public Consciousness

Women in Party Politics

The Reemergence of the ERA

Feminism Enters the Mainstream

Conclusion: Feminism’s Legacy

PRIMARY SOURCES: Feminism and the Drive for Equality in the Workplace

Flight Attendants Protest Discriminatory Practices (1974) • AT&T Advertises for Telephone Operators • AT&T Promotes Women Installers • Women in the Coal Mines • Kansas City Firefighters • The Willmar Eight • Rabbi Sally Preisand • “Hire him. He’s got great legs.” • “This healthy, normal baby has a handicap. She was born female.” • “When I grow up, I’m going to be a judge, or a senator or maybe president.”

PRIMARY SOURCES: Women’s Liberation

JO FREEMAN, What the Hell is Women’s Liberation Anyway? (1968) • THIRD WORLD WOMEN’S ALLIANCE, Statement (1971) •MIRTA VIDAL, New Voice of La Raza: Chicanas Speak Out (1971) • BREAD AND ROSES, Outreach Leaflet (1970) • DANA DENSMORE, Who Is Saying Men Are the Enemy? (1970) • RADICALESBIANS, The Woman Identified Woman (1970) • ANNE KOEDT, The Myth of the Vaginal Orgasm (1970) • PAT MAINARDI, The Politics of Housework (1970)

CHAPTER 12 U.S. Women in a Global Age, 1980–Present

FEMINISM AND THE NEW RIGHT

The STOP-ERA Campaign

Reading into the Past: What’s Wrong with “Equal Rights” for Women

The Abortion Wars

Antifeminism Diffuses Through the Culture

FEMINISM AFTER THE SECOND WAVE

Ecofeminism

Peace Activism

Third-Wave Feminism

Reading into the Past: The Feminist Diaspora

WOMEN AND POLITICS

The 1980s: Carter and Reagan

Anita Hill and Clarence Thomas

The Clinton Years

George W. Bush

The Election of 2008: A Historic Presidential Choice

The Obama Years

The Long War on Terror

WOMEN’S LIVES IN MODERN AMERICA AND THE WORLD

Inequalities — Old and New — in the Labor Force

Combating Discrimination

Changes in Family and Sexuality

Changing Marriage Patterns

Parenting

Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgendered Rights

Women and the New Immigration

Conclusion: Women Face a New Century

PRIMARY SOURCES: Women in the Military

“We don’t promise you a rose garden either” (1999) • SHIRLEY SAGAWA AND NANCY DUFF CAMPBELL, “Women in Combat” (1992) • Chris Beck and Kristen Beck (2013) • DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, “Tailhook 91” (1992) • Review of Hero Mom (2013) • Major Margaret Witt Gets Married (2012)

PRIMARY SOURCES: Facing the Future: Women’s History to Come

KATHA POLLIT, Pro: Reclaiming Abortion Rights (2014) • The Convention to Eliminate All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (1993) • STEPHANIE COONTZ, “Why is “having it all” just a women’s issue?” (2012)

APPENDIX: PRIMARY SOURCES

Seneca Falls Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions

Major U.S. Supreme Court Decisions Through Women’s Eyes

APPENDIX: TABLES AND CHARTS

CHART 1 U.S. Birthrate, 1820–2010

TABLE 1 U.S. Women and Work, 1820–2012

TABLE 2 Participation Rate in the Female Labor Force, by Family Status, 1890–2010

TABLE 3, Degrees Granted to Women, 1950–2010

TABLE 4 Occupational Distribution (in Percentages) of Working Women Ages Fourteen Years and Older, 1900–2000

TABLE 5 Immigration to the United States, 1900–2013

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